Lock 3 – How it works

Besides being a sight that most people never get a chance to see, this also shows some of the important features of the locks on the Trent Severn Waterway.

Look at the lower lock gate – you can see that the bottom of the gate runs in a depression that is lower than the lock floor. Combined with the massive hinges and the way that the lock gates fit together, this feature allows the lock gate to withstand the force of the water that is in the lock when it is filled.

You can see one of the two exit ports that allow water to drain out of the lock when the drain valves are opened. The one shown in this picture is operated manually; the other is power operated.

coffer dam, frankford, education,k-12,Glen Miller, Quinte West, Trent-Severn Waterway National Historic Site of Canada,how does a lock work

You can also see one of the two sets of ports that allow water to fill, or drain, from the lock. The set shown is connected to the manually operated valves. An identical set is located on the other side of the lock.

coffer dam, frankford, education,k-12,Glen Miller, Quinte West, Trent-Severn Waterway National Historic Site of Canada,how does a lock work

The Parks Canada staff have been busy – the piles of rocks and junk that people tossed into the lock (and the key to the women’s washroom!) have been removed, the piles of zebra mussels are gone, and the mooring lines have been taken out. Is sand blasting the lock walls next? Stay tuned to find out!

 

As interesting as this is, please consider staying home and enjoying the locks through the safety of your computer:

  • This is an active construction site – please stay well back from the lock, and out of the way.
  • DO NOT attempt to gain access to or walk on the floor of the lock.
  • DO NOT attempt to bypass barriers to gain access to or walk on the lock gates.
  • Lock station grounds are not staffed during the non-navigation season from mid October to the end of May and are not intended for public use during those times. As some locations are remote and isolated, an injured person could remain unattended.
  • Some public safety hazards may exist. For instance, wet leaves, ice, and snow may remain on stairs and walkways.
  • For public safety, it is important that people stay away from all dams, water control structures, lock chambers and lock gates.
  • Visit at your own risk.



All images © 2012


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