CC-129 Dakota

A Douglas Dakota, or CC-129/C-47/DC-3 as pleases you.

Douglas Dakota,CC-129,C-47,DC-3  The Douglas CC-129 Dakota was acquired by the RCAF in early 1943 and served until finally officially retiring in 1988 (some continued to fly until January, 1990) as the longest serving Aircraft in the RCAF/CF.

The C?47 outwardly resembled the civilian DC?3 in every detail, except two: The addition of a navigator’s dome (astrodome) above and just behind the cockpit, and the other more distinguishing feature, the “barn door” on the left side of the aircraft. There were subtle differences too, including six inches being added to the wing center section, cutting nine inches off the length, reducing the fuel capacity of 882 gallons to 805 gallons, and a strengthened floor.

Douglas Dakota,CC-129,C-47,DC-3

In June, 1970 the Dakotas were redesignated as CC-129 and the remaining fleet of 71 was reserialled causing the aircraft originally delivered as 42-92419, known to the RCAF as 992 to become 12963.

  • Wingspan: 28.95m
  • Length: 19.64m
  • Max Weight: 11,793kg
  • Max Speed: 369 km/h
  • Crew:  2 pilots, 3 crew,
  • Passengers: 36 or 27 combat troops
  • Payload: 2,700 kg
  • Empty weight: 18,135 lb (8,226 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 26,000 lb (11,793 kg)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 31,000 lb (14,061 kg)
  • Powerplant: 2 × Pratt & Whitney R-1830-90C Twin Wasp 14-cylinder radial engines, 1,200 hp (895 kW) each
  • Maximum speed: 224 mph (195 kn, 360 km/h) at 10,000 ft (3,050 m)
  • Cruise speed: 160 mph (139 kn, 257 km/h)
  • Range: 1,600 mi (1,391 nmi, 2,575 km)
  • Ferry range: 3,600 mi (3,130 nmi, 5,795 km)
  • Service ceiling: 26,400 ft (8,045 m)
  • Climb to 10,000 ft (3,050 m): 9.5 min
  • Role:  Transport, Trainer, Target Towing, and Search & Rescue, EW
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